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Happy New Year

 
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jrswriter
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Joined: 28 Nov 2007
Posts: 245

PostPosted: Fri Dec 30, 2011 2:30 pm    Post subject: Happy New Year Reply with quote

Happy New Year


Habari Gani. As we transit into 2012, I wish each and everyone reading this a year full of prosperity, health, wholeness, empowerment but most of all courage; the courage to find meaning, purpose and fulfillment in your lives so you evolve into all the CREATOR intends for you to be. The New Year can be thought of as a new series of opportunities to actualize our potential, to make the myriad possibilities and options at our disposal real. The world is what we say it is for us. We have the power and potential to call things that be not as if they are, meaning we can create by calling forth our ideas, desires and images and allow the UNIVERSE to work on our behalf to make them so. We have the gift of imagination the ability to form ideas, pictures and images in our mind's eye. All too often we just use this powerful tool on a lower potency level by merely daydreaming, engaging in fantasy or wishful thinking.

We have the ability to be creators and we can take full advantage of what we already have right here and now to move to a higher level by using our innate powers to envision a better world, wholesome communities, healthier families, a more civil environment, peace and prosperity. In contemporary culture we hear so much about New Year's resolutions, people make lists of what they want to do, be and accomplish during the coming year. Unfortunately because we have not been taught how to actualize our latent powers, talents, gifts and aptitudes, because we do not know who and what we really are and we have not been taught the principles of success we stumble through life rarely accomplishing or achieving the things we say we want out of life. Rarely do we actualize our full potential. Why?

Because we allow others to set our agenda, determine what is important, define our world view, set our self image and focus. We live in a culture that is essentially aspiritual, overly materialistic and ethically cretinous. It is no wonder most of our energies are dissipated and misdirected away from our best interests towards maladaptive conformist behaviors that enrich other folks but endanger our health, well being and undermine our social networks.

We are literally sleeping giants slumbering away as the world/life passes us by. Even worse we find ourselves sitting on the sidelines unaware of the reality that life is not a spectator sport. Wake up, get up and begin to take charge of your life. Happiness, success and fulfillment are inside jobs. No one can make you happy or unhappy. Happiness is not based upon circumstances or your bank account.

We are in the throes of an economic downturn so if your happiness is based upon your income, your cash on hand, the economy or any such thing you probably aren't feeling too euphoric right now. If your happiness is based upon the political landscape, you probably aren't feeling real cheerful now, with all the partisan bickering, the incivility, foolishness and betrayal going on across the political spectrum. But if your happiness is based upon a confidence, an assuredness that all is well no matter what, you are in good shape. Better yet if you envision a better life for yourself, your people and community and you are living in accordance with your vision to the best of your ability, you are probably a happy person.

I produce and host several Internet radio programs on a couple of Internet radio stations. I have to do research to prepare for the guests and topics I cover. Most of my topics are about serious matters such as the wars, politics and the economy. People who are on satellite and Internet radio refer to traditional radio as terrestrial radio because of the towers and the signal comes via the airwaves. Periodically I listen to terrestrial talk radio to get a feel for what people are talking about and how they see the world. What we listen to reflects our consciousness and interests. What you listen to tells a lot about you. What we watch, read or listen to re-enforces our belief system and values (more accurately the beliefs and values we were indoctrinated to accept.) Frankly I'm flummoxed when I listen to sports talk stations; the way the callers refer to their favorite team as “we”; as if they're on the team, suit up, practice, sweat and play the games. They know more about the professional athletes' batting averages, yards per carry, free throw stats than they do abut their own selves. They are hyped to the point of fanaticism and foolishness about men and some women making millions playing games; more so than they are about their own lives !

Sports is a multi-billion dollar industry. As a former high school and college soccer and basketball referee, I know scholastic and collegiate athletics can be an integral part of a well rounded educational experience. But all too often today, professional sports are nothing more than escapism, a way to put the doldrums and monotony of life on hold for a few hours. But why are we bored and stagnant? Life is too full of opportunities and way too short for such things. What if we put the same enthusiasm we put into watching sports into the various aspects of our personal lives? What if we put the same attention to detail and preparation into our own lives we put into making sure we have just the right items for the tailgate party? What if we researched and applied metaphysical and spiritual principles the same way we researched and negotiated our Fantasy Football picks? Do you think there would be a lot more energized and happy people around?

Here's a suggestion, for this year 2012 minimize being a spectator and become more active. Get up, get out and do something different. Enjoy participating in life rather than being a mere witness. Take up a hobby, pursue one of your dreams and ambitions, volunteer, go for it and see what happens. More than likely the process will be an enjoyable one, you'll learn a lot about yourself in the process and you'll be happy doing it.

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